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Atínale al Precio

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Atinale1

1997 Version

Atínale al Precio is a Mexican game show based on The Price is Right that has aired in two separate runs, both hosted by Marco Antonio Regil (replaced by Héctor Sandarti in 2000). The format is similar to the American version of the show, featuring many pricing games that have also appeared on that version.

1997 versionEdit

The showEdit

This version borrowed many elements from the American version (from set, game styles and music that sounds like a salsa version of the TPIR theme). Regil was pointed out by Bob Barker in the VIP of the audience of a US TPIR episode in 1997 and was a candidate to host the US version during the 2007 tryouts. This show also included a light border in its intro, a la the US show, but other elements were borrowed from the UK Bob Warman's show, like in-show sponsorship and a car in the Showcase Showdown.

One BidEdit

The four players in Contestants' Row compete in a One Bid qualifying game to determine which contestant will play the next pricing game. A prize usually worth MXN$2,500 or less is shown and, beginning with the last player to be called down (or the player farthest-left during the first One Bid), each contestant gives a single bid for the item. The order of bidding moves from left to right. Contestants must bid in whole pesos and may not bid the same amount as any player bid previously for that item. The player whose bid is closest to the actual retail price of the prize without going over wins the prize and plays the next pricing game.

If all four contestants overbid, a buzzer sounds before the price is revealed. The host announces the lowest bid, the bids are erased and the bidding process is repeated in the same manner with the contestants instructed to bid lower than the lowest of the original bids.

Pricing gamesEdit

Showcase ShowdownEdit

The Showcase Showdown was played the same way as on the American version. If the wheel stopped at the MXN$1.00, the contestant won a bonus prize of MXN$1,000 and a bonus spin. In the bonus spin, if the wheel stopped on MXN$0.05, the contestant won a bonus prize of MXN$5,000; if it stopped on MXN$0.15, he won a bonus prize of MXN$15,000; and if it stopped on MXN$1.00, he won a new car.

The ShowcaseEdit

The showcase followed the same rules as the U.S. version when the show aired in 1997, with a 100 peso rule for both showcases (the US version's rule changed in 1998 to US$250, but the rule stayed at MXN$100). The closest bid without going over wins the showcase. If there was a double overbid neither wins the showcase. There was a double showcase winner twice. The first time, the difference was MXN$83, and the second time, it was MXN$36.

2010 versionEdit

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Current Logo

The ShowEdit

This version incorporated elements from the American, British, French and Italian versions. From October 4, 2010 until January 21, 2011 there were repeating programs, was sponsored by the supermarket chain Chedraui, and cars were supplied by General Motors, the intro was similar to French show.

One BidEdit

The four players in Contestants' Row compete in a One Bid qualifying game to determine which contestant will play the next pricing game. A prize usually worth MXN$6,000 or less is shown and, beginning with the last player to be called down (or the player farthest-left during the first One Bid), each contestant gives a single bid for the item. The order of bidding moves from left to right. Contestants must bid in whole pesos and may not bid the same amount as any player bid previously for that item. The player whose bid is closest to the actual retail price of the prize without going over wins the prize and plays the next pricing game. However, a "cha-ching" sound signifies a perfect bid; whoever gave that exact bid would win a 1,000 peso bonus in addition.

If all four contestants overbid, a buzzer sounds before the price is revealed. The host announces the lowest bid, the bids are erased and the bidding process is repeated in the same manner with the contestants instructed to bid lower than the lowest of the original bids.

Pricing gamesEdit

Differences from the U.S. version are listed.

Showcase ShowdownEdit

La Ruleta (The Showcase Showdown) followed faithfully to the United States version in the first and second Showcase Showdowns, with the wheel's patterns faithful to the counterpart to the north (100, 15, 80, 35, 60, 20, 40, 75, 55, 95, 50, 85, 30, 65, 10, 45, 70, 25, 90, 5). The bonus for MXN$1.00 (one or two spins) was worth MXN$1,000.

The bonus spin was administered in the same way as the original Mexican version. If the wheel stopped on the MXN$.05, the bonus was MXN$5,000. If the wheel stopped on MXN$1.00, a new car was awarded. If the wheel stopped on MXN$.15, the contestant won MXN$15,000.

At the end of the second Showcase Showdown, the two winners participated in a spinoff to determine the player who advances to the one-player Showcase. There were no bonuses for going MXN$1.00 in this spin.

Gran Paquete (The Showcase)Edit

The Showcase was played in the one-player format similar to European versions and the 1994 syndicated version of the show, with the price ranges between MXN$3,000 and MXN$30,000, and whatever the contestant stopped was the range the contestant had to come from the actual retail price of the Showcase without going over to win it. The closest win was MXN$16 from the actual retail price.

LinksEdit

Game Show Central: Atínale al Precio

YouTube VideosEdit

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